Deaf Ears

So, ABS-CBN has just brought back “Princess Sarah” to its morning lineup as a replacement for the ageing rerun of Kuroko’s Basketball season 2, while Marcelino Pan y Vino  has also replaced Naruto Shippuuden on its timeslot as well. Spongebob is still there at the 9 AM slot.

And that is how you destroy a morning slot.

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Radio is Alive, and Radyo Pirata is Reinventing Radio.

Once called the most tuned-to media in the past, and the one who eclipsed Newspapers in delivering news in the lightning-speed delivery of news and information. The medium that made Filipinos at home with the voices of personalities such as Johnny De Leon, Paeng Yabut, Soc Rodrigo, Pugo, Chichay, Ike Lozada, Johnny Midnight, Joe Taruc, Noli De Castro, Ted Failon, Joe Taruc, Rey Langit, Neal Ocampo,  Dely Magpayo, and Don Manolo Favis, to name a few.  The medium that Filipinos carry everywhere, listening to it to see if classes are suspended, or whether there’s a senate hearing. On the road, on the farm, or on the living room. Radio was, as I’d like to quote my broadcast Professor Alan Allanigue (which he quotes someone, I honestly don’t remember who it was that ) “the theater of the mind”

But Radio has now given way to Television, and online, as the youth’s source of information and entertainment. Radio is now being reinvented and retooled, with traditional stations going into the Online streaming route, and newer stations, because of the lack of available frequencies, (our frequency table for both AM and FM stations are now full) are now resorting to use the much more infinite space of online-only audio streaming.

One such station is Radyo Pirata, broadcasting online to serve the anime community with music, information and, more often, live radio coverage of Anime Events that surpasses even how Ed Murrow and the Boys do it during the London Blitz. RP does their event coverage with flair and zeal and doing the coverage like any other radio station  who does outside coverage of events. That way, RP is not only re-imaging radio, but the station is bringing in a service like no other, and that is to bring the latest anime events to those people who can’t go to events.

In other words, We’re bringing in the events to the listener directly.

But people would ask. Why radio? Why not do a video stream? The answer simply is  this, I honestly believe that radio gives a more personal vibe to the listener than simply watching the event. Sure you can look at the live video stream of an event, but having a radio coverage of an anime event gives you not only a sense of urgency and also a sense of “being there”, You are being carried by your ears to a dimension an event goer surely will miss. The listener will be at the heart of the action, and will hear the anchors talking to the guests and personalities of the event. That is why I prefer doing live radio coverage than TV.

Their programs are also first rate and a cut above the rest, especially my own program on Radyo Pirata, which is Knightkira Special Patrol, of which I serve not only as the host, but also executive producer, writer, audio engineer and researcher all rolled into one (a one man army, they say). Every Tuesday night, I give to you the latest anime news and issues, fearless commentaries, and above all, music that is not only entertaining, but also a cut above the rest. Our first season has just wrapped up, and Next year, FreedomStrike Radio (the one handling the radio production details of KSP) will relaunch KSP into something more deeper, called “At Large”.

“At Large” will be very different from KSP in terms of content and presentation. It will be doing old-style radio for a new audience, and preparations are necessary for us to have a really good show to air coming next year. Again, it will be on-air weekly, in the same timeslot vacated by KSP. And yes, FSR will also do some more radio shows in cooperation with  the management of Radyo Pirata in order to give you a more enlightened and more informed otaku voice.

Yes, Radio is evolving, Radio is being revolutionized. And Radyo Pirata is destined to be a key player in the revolution of bringing radio to the untouched and unserved. By providing a targeted audience with shows that would enlighten otakus, Radyo Pirata is bound to be a new force to be reckoned with in radio, and with FreedomStrike on board, the journey is soon going to be exciting.

And That’s The Way It is, Headin’ Out!

FreedomStrike Radio is a division of the FreedomStrike Group, of which this blog is a subsidiary. 

Anime on Television: Boon or Bane?

To open up this blog post, I will extract two very beautiful dialogues and scenes from my current series addiction, The Newsroom, on its 7th episode, The first one is where Charlie Skinner (Sam Waterston) is having a heated debate with Leona Lansing (Jane Fonda), and I am going to link the post from the show’s official page.

 

“We don’t have the trust of the Public Anymore”. A strongly worded statement there, (if you don’t know what the hell Charlie is saying, watch it from the start of Season 1)

 

And this post from one of the lead characters, the ubiquitous Mackenzie MacHale (Emily Mortimer)

Now, why do I had to start with those quotes from them? Because Television is a public trust, we all know that. The public trusts television not just because of the news content. The people trusts television because it has been their constant companion ever since. When we were born (well, if you were born post-October 7, 1953), TV has become our ultimate companion. We have been bombarded with the latest news, information and entertainment in our midst. Take note that TV has become our babysitter, mentor (and tormentor), guide, informer, and, most of all, entertainer. Sure the concept of “trust” would only be allowed (and is definitely true) in news and information/factual programming. But do entertainment shows have that same “trust” factor that people behind the scenes also understand?

Personally, yes, There is still that “trust” when it comes to entertainment programming, and in what form does “trust” go in entertainment? Well, a very vague example is you trust ABS-CBN, GMA or TV5 to provide the best teleseryes that will air from morning till night. You trust these three networks to give to you the Korean drama you wanted to watch. And, in our topic. You trust these three networks for the best in Anime. 

Yes, you trust them for the best in Anime. You entrust the networks to at least understand you and air the best anime titles. Whether it was already aired before or even an ongoing series from Japan, you want to trust them to deliver what you really want in terms of anime programming.

But the networks betrayed you because they did not air what you wanted them to air. And you, the viewer, think that the networks has left you, and thus, you lost their trust to them.

It’s the same line I have been hearing and reading since I first became engulfed in the culture in 2004. The networks will never spend foolish company money just for an anime title which will only be watched by a few thousand people, and that is basically true. Anime audiences are a fickle as compared to the k-drama and the primetime and daytime soaps that can reach a mass-based audience. Anime audiences are just a simple niche, as compared to the general audiences that these networks want in effort to get ratings (and revenues) for them to support their business.

Yes, Television is a business, not a charity organization. But it seems that anime fans are taking anime programming more seriously to a level that is already on the “facepalm levels”.

Yes, I do believe that Free TV terrestrial stations must have a semblance of anime programming in their lineups. Ever since GMA introduced the very first anime series on TV, which was Voltes V, It has become a culture, and a part of our lives. (Well, you have to thank Freddie Garcia for that). And if not for an executive who wanted to dub anime in Filipino and some regional languages, the masses (yes, the very same teleserye-loving masses) will never understand what these characters are saying (again, credit that to FMG)

I also do believe that Anime on Free TV should also be the latest anime series from Japan, as evidenced by ABS-CBN’s pilfering of Kuroko’s Basketball which not only topped the Nationals, (the first ever anime series from ABS-CBN to top the national ratings since time immemorial, and even break into the daily Top 20 for a time), but has endeared many people because of its storyline, which connects the audiences well. Not only because of its bishie characters, but because of its story, A story that would make ABS-CBN’s Teleserye writers more like novices in comparison.

But because of the tight financial burden anime has become, No free television channel will ever risk investing a new title and place it on a slot where advertisers lust for it. No one will invest in anime on prime time because hey, it’s more wise to create a 50-million peso teleserye than a let’s say, 10-million peso, 25-episode anime title at 6:00PM. Advertisers are not going to invest on anime simply because Anime is for kids, and what products will they only put in these kinds of programs? Fastfood Toys, Sodas, plus the fact that anime is all to underestimated by a lot of network people!

That is where cable comes in, and as i’d like to say a sports jargon, “No harm, no foul.”

Cable is there to serve that niche. Yes, it is expensive (picture PHP 2000 peso installations and monthly fees ranging from 300 pesos to 2000 pesos/month, that’s why these “anime otakus” who watch on Free TV despise cable)  but it is more effective to program in cable because there is that niche. And cable has two sources of income. The revenue it generates from the operators who are willing to shell out carriage fees per month, and advertiser support. Nowadays, Advertisers are not only banking on Free TV to show their products, with the advent of Cable and Satellite, (to think, we have more cabled and satellite-installed homes today as compared to 10, or even 5 years ago), Advertisers are now more tightly-focused. They now peddle their products to the exact audiences that they want, and that’s how the power of Cable and Satellite can also influence network execs.

Now, let me give you this question: Is Anime on TV a boon or a bane?

My answer, Yes, it’s a boon, but it could also be a bane. It’s a boon for the networks and audiences. It’s a boon for the networks because it is a chance to show them a content which is quite different from the normal fare. It is also a boon for TV programmers to finally get that millennial audiences they are so hard to program with. Just think. Anime is a genre that could connect to a wide array of audiences, audiences that need escape from the regular fare that they always see.

But its a bane too, A bane on the part of networks because of fans being too demanding. A bane on advertisers because it is not a marketable format to put products on, and a bane on those who loved k-dramas and regular local fare because of anime being, “For Kids Only”

Now, would we trust the Networks again to air the best anime programs like “Free”, “Gin no Saji” and “Shingeki no Kyojin” because of these reasons?

And that’s they way it is, Headin’ Out!

 

The Destruction of Real Anime Journalism

 

So these people won. These people who advocate tabloid journalism and nonsense reporting won. They won by kicking me out, and that, my friends, meant that good guys really finish last.

I have been putting it off for the past few days just to let off some steam, but I can’t hold it any longer. For these people who don’t know anything about journalism is going to triumph over real journalism, journalism with hard nosed inquisitorial skills, depth of coverage, and even skillful mastery of the words with a flair for objectivity and integrity.

Again, I reiterate my stand., Anime Journalism is what I do, not tabloid journalism. I’m doing what I think is right, and some “hao shiao” bloggers are now making their way to events, creating “real event reports” without even making sure their facts are straight. I am not one in buying that kind of journalism. No, no.

 

I started with a clear concept in my mind, and that is to report Anime events the way Walter Lippmann, Eric Sevareid, Walter Cronkite, Edward Murrow and other great journalistic heavies of the past. I’m sure, if these people read the stories of these guys, they would have turned in their graves for mocking the sacred job of journalism.

I was even being forced to shut up by these guys, but shutting me up will warrant in their violating my constitutional right to free speech and expression. Were these guys learned on the constitution or are they just effing up?

Now, I find myself alone, fighting this fight against these imbeciles who don’t really know how journalism is done, and for me, I stand trod on viewpoints that vindicated me and my passion to report just only the facts and facts alone. I am a correspondent, trained by the best people who I respected much and gave me valuable views, at the same time teaching me to stand on my ground. My education taught me to be steadfast on my beliefs, and for sticking what I know is right. In the end, while people are laughing at me, kicking me on the ground and also criticizing not only my work but on my personality as well, I will have the gall to say, “You don’t belong here, This is what separates the men from the boys” to these “fake anime journalists” who don’t even have an iota of credibility and respectability to boot, and get so much attention for being the “most liked page on Facebook or most followed on twitter or their articles are trending”. Number of followers does not make it credible, period.

And, one more thing, If I would have to do it the hard way, then yes, I’m glad to oblige, but in the end, I am going to be right.

 

For now, this post really sums up what I feel, and if people get offended by this, I am saying my apologies in advance. but nothing will ever stop me in this crusade, even if it counts as BS to some, or a rant for others, but as what my Professor, David Nye said “You serve best by doing that which you love most

 

Knightkira Special Patrol still airs every Tuesday Nights. and Sui Generis is now on its preproduction stages.

 

Headin’Out!